Health

AMREF PROGRAM

Health

Trained 200 (147 female) community health workers in Kenya

We invested on a 1:3 ratio to Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (formerly CIDA) in the African Medical Research Foundation’s  (AMREF)  program to train 200 community health workers in Kenya’s Makueni District, where the doctor to patient ratio is 1:162,000. By comparison, in Canada the ratio is on average 1:470. Services delivered over the program implementation included 38,000 household visits, 1,825 insecticide-treated bed nets distributed (865 to pregnant women, 960 to children under 5, 80 public health sessions were held. Community Health Workers reporting successfully lobbied district officials for the construction of a health facility that now serves 10,091 people who previously had to travel 30km to access a health facility.  Learn more

PAEDIATRIC NURSE TRAINING

Health

Trained 200 (147 female) community health workers in Kenya

We invested on a 1:3 ratio to Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (formerly CIDA) in SickKids-Ghana pilot to to establish the very first paediatric nursing training program in all of West Africa. With the collaboration of the Government of Ghana and the University of Ghana Nursing Faculty, SickKids established a standardized paediatric nursing curriculum that it used to train a specialized cohort of 223 Ghanian nurses in paediatric nursing. These nurses are now deployed across Ghana making an impact on child health, from the delivery of specialized clinical care to sharing knowledge with their colleagues.

Health

Fellowship of Kenyan pathologist at SickKids

We sponsored Dr. Elizabeth Dimba‘s fellowship at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto is part of our wider program of co-investing in health initiatives in Africa. Dr. Dimba is a leading pathologist within the maxillofacial team at the University of Nairobi. During her fellowship, she covered the diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and follow-up aspects of modern retinoblastoma management at the Hospital for Sick Children and other selected hospitals within the University of Toronto Health Network. Since her return to Kenya, Dr. Dimba has coordinated a centralized diagnostic service based at the University of Nairobi pathology Labs. Dr. Dimba comments: “Provision of medical care in Kenya can be frustrating when we lack the resources and infrastructure to help our patients. If we are going to have any impact at all on child mortality, then a strategic partnership with organizations like Toronto SickKids Hospital is obviously the way to continue.”

 

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Charity BN/Registration Number: 80145 2244 RR0001